Long Range Planning

  • Master Plan
  • Transportation Planning
  • Capital Improvement Program
  • Annexation
  • Landscape / Tree Mitigation
  • Building and Development Summary
Text Size   - | +

Urban Design

Below are video presentations explaining the Area of Civic Importance Urban Design zoning. The presentations are divided into multiple 2-4 minute videos. Please view the Part One, Part Two and their corresponding segments sequentially for the best results. A printable reference handout is provided for note taking and reference.

We hope you find this information useful to better understanding the ACI implementation. Please contact the Urban Design section of the Planning Department with comments or suggestions to improve this presentation material. Thank you!

Part One - Introduction (20 minutes total)

 

Description 

Key Points 

Windows (.WMV) 

Apple (.MOV) 

1A

Introduction to Urban Design Zoning 

  • New zoning implements the Urban Design Element of the Omaha Master Plan
  • ACI zoning will help to improve the key image forming corridors for Omaha

1a.wmv 

1a.mov 

1B

Great Streets 

  • ACI zoning improves the quality of public spaces, specifically streets and sidewalks

1b.wmv 

1b.mov 

1C

Urban Design Principles -  Placemaking 

  • Streets become places when properly designed and coordinated
  • Building placement in relation to the street and sidewalk is a critical aspect of urban design

1c.wmv 

1c.mov 

1D

Current Zoning Regulations 

  • Current zoning needs to be supplemented to improve the quality of design outcome 

1d.wmv 

1d.mov 

1E

Current Zoning in a Traditional Context 

  • Traditional development patterns are valued for their quality of design 
  • These areas may be compromised by incompatible sub-urban style development built under current zoning regulations
  • Many new commercial developments use tradition urban design features and accommodate pedestrians

1e.wmv 

1e.mov 

1F

Complete Streets and Multiple Use Functions 

  • A complete street is more than a traffic solution - it provides for all users and activities
  • The street environment should be conceived of as a dynamic, multi-use facility providing quality of life amenities

1f.wmv 

1f.mov 

 

Part Two - Urban Design Provisions (25 minutes total)

 

Description 

Key Points  

Windows (.WMV) 

Apple (.MOV) 

2A

Urban Design Tools and Applicability

  • ACI zoning is one of many urban design implementation strategies
  • Existing zoning will remain and urban design zoning will be added as "overlay zoning"
  • ACI zoning only applies when new development occurs, it is NOT retroactive
  • ACI zoning does not affect single-family zoned parcels

2a.wmv 

2a.mov 

2B

New Code Sections - Applicability 

  • The new zoning provisions apply in varying degrees based on district type and context
  • They generally address improvements for Pedestrian design, Site design, and Building design

2b.wmv 

2b.mov 

2C

New Code Sections - Pedestrian Design  

  • New development will provide street trees and wide sidewalks
  • When buildings are adjacent to a sidewalk the first floor must meet minimum transparency requirements
  • Buildings will be located in relationship with the street

2c.wmv 

2c.mov 

2D

Four Types of ACI Districts

  • There are 4 types of ACI districts to accommodate the suitability of pedestrian activity within different contexts

2d.wmv 

2d.mov 

2E

Build-to/Setback, Baselines and Transparency - General Function 

  • A "Baseline" is a reference line that locates the streetwall and in most cases aligns with the property line
  • Building facades and primary entrances must be oriented in relation to the Baseline
  • Transparency occurs when facades have proximity to a baseline or on facades with primary entrances
  • There is a wide variety of options for building placement, primary entrance location, and transparency within each ACI district.
  • A public plaza also fulfills Build-to/Set-Back requirements

2e.1.wmv 

2e.mov 

2F

New Code Sections - Site Design  

  • Service areas need to be screened from public view
  • Green Parking lots require additional landscaping and buffering from the ACI street
  • Parking structures will meet design guidelines and in some case be required to include commercial uses at the ground floor
  • Site access may be limited to reduce vehicular and pedestrian conflict at the sidewalk
  • Utilities will be placed underground
  • Signs will meet more strict regulations
  • Retaining walls are limited in size when in proximity to pedestrian areas or public view

2f.wmv 

2f.mov

2G

New Code Sections - Building Design 

  • There are two building classifications; Large Retail Buildings and General Buildings
  • Large Retail Buildings are specifically addressed to offset a perceived quality deficit
  • General Buildings easily meet basic design requirements, however, smaller retail buildings will be improved by this provision too

2g.wmv 

2g.mov

 

Part Three - Case Studies (more case studies coming soon)

 

Description 

Windows (.WMV) 

Apple (.MOV) 

3A

50th and Dodge

3a.wmv 

3a.mov 

3B

South 13th and William Street

3b.wmv 

3b.mov 

 

 

 

 

Status Key:

 

Status 

Description

In Review

Currently being reviewed by City staff

Q&A 

Public question and answer period after initial notice

PB 

Submitted to the Planning Board for approval 

CC 

Submitted to the City Council for approval  

Project Status:

Project 

Description/Map

Initial Notice 

Scheduled Planning Board Hearing Date 

City Council Hearings   

 

 

1st reading 

2nd Reading 

3rd Reading 

Status 

 

 14.0

Abbott Drive 

April 25, 2012 

July 11, 2012 

Aug 14, 2012 

Aug 21, 2012

Aug 28, 2012 

Approved

 13.0

N. 72nd - Cuming to I-680 

April 25, 2012  

July 11, 2012 

Aug 14, 2012 

Aug 21, 2012

Aug 28, 2012

Approved

 12.0

S. 72nd - I-80 to Pacific 

April 25, 2012  

July 11, 2012 

Aug 14, 2012 

Aug 21, 2012

Aug 28, 2012

Approved

 11.0

Dodge - 90th to 96th and 120th to 132nd 

April 25, 2012  

July 11, 2012 

Aug 14, 2012 

Aug 21, 2012

Aug 28, 2012

Approved

10.0

Midtown - Leavenworth Street 

May 24, 2012 

Sept 5, 2012 

Oct 16, 2012

Oct 23, 2012

Oct 30, 2012

Approved

9.0

 

Midtown - Farnam and Harney Streets

June 6th, 2011

 

Sept 7, 2011

Approved 

Nov 8, 2011 

 

Nov 22, 2011

 

Dec 6, 2011 

Approved

7.0

 

 S. 24th Corridor

Sept 20, 2011

 

Jan 4, 2012

Approved

Feb 7, 2012 

 

Feb 14, 2012

 

Feb 28, 2012

 

Approved

6.0

 

N 30th and Ames 

July 8th, 2011

Sept 7, 2011

Approved

 

Nov 8, 2011 

Nov 22, 2011

Dec 6, 2011 

Approved

5.1

Section 1

Downtown (areas coinciding with the master plan) 

May 7, 2010 

July 7, 2011

 

Approved

Aug 17, 2010 

Aug 24, 2010

Aug 31, 2010

Approved

5.2 

Section 2

Downtown (areas coinciding with the master plan) 

June 11, 2010 

Aug 4, 2010 and Sept 1, 2010

Approved

Oct 19, 2010

Oct 26, 2010 

Nov 2, 2010 

Approved

5.3 

Section 3 

Downtown (areas coinciding with the master plan) 

June 11, 2010 

 

Aug 4, 2010 and Sept 1, 2010

Approved

Oct 19, 2010

 

Oct 26, 2010  

 

Nov 2, 2010  

 

Approved

5.4 

Section 4 

Downtown (areas coinciding with the master plan) 

July 9, 2010 

 

Sept 1, 2010

Approved

Oct 19, 2010

 

Oct 26, 2010  

Nov 2, 2010  

Approved

4.0 

 

Dodge Street from 69th to 90th and 72nd Street from Cass to Pacific

 

Jan 8, 2010

 

Mar 3, 2010

Approved 

Mar 30, 2010

 

 

Apr 13, 2010

 

Apr 20, 2010

 

Approved

 

Completed Projects:

Project 3.0 - Dodge Street, Turner Park to Saddle Creek Rd - Approved

Project 2.3 - Dodge Street, Saddle Creek Rd to 69th Street - Approved

Project 2.2 - Dodge Street, 132nd Street to 192nd Street - Approved

Project 2.1 - S. 13th Street, Leavenworth to Interstate I-80 - Approved

Project 1.0 - Dodge Street, 49th Street to 51st Street - Approved

 

Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) is an approach that considers the total context within which a transportation improvement project will exist. This recommended practice was produced in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and in partnership with the Congress for the New Urbanism.

The National Complete Streets Coalition advocates a complete streets policy that ensures that transportation planners and engineers consistently design and operate the entire roadway with all users in mind - including bicyclists, public transportation vehicles and riders, and pedestrians of all ages and abilities.

Department of Transportation website listing all DOT agencies including:

Bicycle and Pedestrian Information Center strives to improve the quality of life in communities through the increase of safe walking and bicycling as a viable means of transportation and physical activity. Includes an image library.

The Federal Transit Administration provides stewardship of combined formula and discretionary programs totaling more than $10B to support a variety of locally planned, constructed, and operated public transportation systems throughout the United States.

The Surface Transportation Policy Project is a diverse, nationwide coalition working to ensure safer communities and smarter transportation choices that enhance the economy, improve public health, promote social equity, and protect the environment.

The League of American Bicyclists promotes bicycling for fun, fitness, and transportation and work through advocacy and education for a bicycle-friendly America.

 

 

Online access to the Omaha Municipal Code including zoning and urban design regulations.

The Omaha-Douglas County Geographic Information System (GIS) website provides access to a wide variety of geographic and spatial data including zoning districts, topography and parcel information.

Omaha By Design is dedicated to changing the face of Omaha through the use of urban design principles and citizen engagement. Founded in 2001, the organization facilitates partnerships between the public and private sectors to execute projects that improve the quality of the natural and built environments throughout the metropolitan area.

Metropolitan Area Planning Agency A voluntary association of local governments coordinating planning, development and transportation activities.

 


New Urbanism recognizes walkable, human-scaled neighborhoods as the building blocks of sustainable communities and regions. The Charter for New Urbanism articulates the movement’s principles and defines the essential qualities of urban places from the scale of the region to the individual building.

The New Urban News is a professional newsletter for planners, developers, architects, builders, public officials and others who are interested in the creation of human-scale communities.

Smart Growth America is a coalition of national, state and local organizations working to improve the ways we plan and build the towns, cities and metro areas we call home.

Project for Public Spaces (PPS) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping people create and sustain public places that build communities.

The Main Street movement has transformed the way communities think about the revitalization and management of their commercial districts.

The Form Based Code Institute advocates a method of regulating development to achieve a specific urban form. Form-based codes create a predictable public realm primarily by controlling physical form, with a lesser focus on land use, through city or county regulations.

The SmartCode is a model transect-based development code available for all scales of planning, from the region to the community to the block and building. The code is intended for local calibration to your town or neighborhood. As a form-based code, the SmartCode keeps towns compact and rural lands open, while reforming the destructive sprawl-producing patterns of separated use zoning.

The Center for Applied Transect Studies (CATS) promotes understanding of the built environment as part of the natural environment, through the planning methodology of the rural-to-urban transect. CATS supports interdisciplinary research, publication, tools, and training for the design, coding, building and documentation of resilient transect-based communities.